Liquid

I know I’m on vacation, but this seems important: for the first time, the Department of Homeland Security has deemed an entire state of matter to be a national security risk.

Phase Diagram Alert Level

Cynical-C has more (and more).

  1. You’d imagine the right time to do this would have been after the 2004 tsunami. Water is vicious. As an extra bonus we all consist of some 70% water so finally Bush has an argument to treat everyone as a terrorist.

  2. I believe the new “British correspondent” on the Daily Show made this point the other night. The “terrorists” have struck a metaphoric knife into the heart of our liquid based culture and beings. We can never be free again.

  3. What state of matter is plastic (the putty-like kind you see in movies depicting explosives)?
    – Bob

  4. I suspect that anyone trying to sneak on an international flight sporting an irreverent phase diagram on their T-shirt would be in danger of getting hauled off for lengthy interrogation. But you’re welcome to spread the picture around.

  5. Surely all of us agree that Dihydrogen Monoxide is a dangerous substance (it can cause death even in minute quantities if inhaled) and should be totally banned!

  6. What’s the alert level for BE condensates? Are they allowed as carry-ons, or must they be checked with luggage?

  7. I am getting awfully tired of the bad rep that unenlightened non-scientists have been giving to “dihydrogen monoxide” (DHMO). They tell you that inhaling it can be deadly, prolonged exposure to its solid form can cause tissue damage, whatever.

    Dont fall for the hype.

    In the first place, as soon as someone calls it “dihydrogen monoxide”, you know that you are dealing with a non-scientist with an agenda. The correct scientific nomenclature is “hydrogen hydroxide”. Why do the critics call it DHMO? Because it just sounds scarier and people are more likely to liken it to carbon monoxide in their minds.

    In the second place, the dangers of hydrogen hydroxide have been greatly exagerated. Anyone who works with or deals with hydrogen hydroxide on a regular basis can eliminate most of the dangers of it with a few simple precautions. Simply by avoiding inhalation and wearing protective gear when dealing with it solid and gasseous states, you can deal with this relatively benign substance safely.

    Secondly, studies have shown that there are several animals that require hydrogen hydroxide on a regular basis in order to survive. While it is true that hydrogen hydroxide has been found in the tumors of cancer patients, many people have been exposed to hydrogen hydroxide in laboratory conditions with no ill effects. Many of the health issues surrounding hydrogen hydroxide are not even about hydrogen hydroxide, but rather other contaminants. Pure hydrogen hydroxide can be perfectly safe.

    So the next time someone starts telling you about the dangers of “dihydrogen monoxide” feel free to point out the error of their ways. And just because I know that people will be maiking the accusation, no, I have never recieved money, good, or services from the “dihydogen monoxide” lobby for presenting my opinion.

  8. Pingback: HE&OS » Blog Archive » SNARKY SCIENCE HUMOR

  9. Also, it’s more like 90% that our bodies are water. 70% is the extent of Earth’s surface covered by water.

    Also read the potential spectacle of using body cavities (bladder, stomach) for storing the liquid explosive ingredients for later use.

  10. With Apologies to BunBun vonWhiskers:

    Protection of Civilians from Terrorists
    And the Dangers of Marijuana and Other Natural Chemicals

    Unenlightened non-scientists have been giving a bad rap to “dihydrogen monoxide” (DHMO). They tell you that inhaling it can be deadly, prolonged exposure to its solid form can cause tissue damage, whatever. It sounds suspiciously like the unscientific campaign against common, roadside-grown marijuana, and probably comes from the same sources: Unelected high officials in federal government having their first taste of power, urged on by elected officials who profess to want to “protect” citizens…but, only if reelected.

    Don’t fall for the hype.

    In the first place, as soon as someone calls it “dihydrogen monoxide”, you know that you are dealing with a non-scientist with an agenda. The correct scientific nomenclature is “hydrogen hydroxide”. Why do the critics call it DHMO? Because it just sounds scarier and people are more likely to liken it to carbon monoxide in their minds.

    In the second place, the dangers of hydrogen hydroxide have been greatly exaggerated. Anyone who works with or deals with hydrogen hydroxide on a regular basis can eliminate dangers with a few simple precautions. Avoid inhalation and wear protective gear when dealing with solid and gaseous states, and you can safely deal with this relatively benign substance.

    Studies have shown that there are several animals that require hydrogen hydroxide on a regular basis in order to survive. While it is true that hydrogen hydroxide has been found in the tumors of cancer patients, many people have been exposed to hydrogen hydroxide in laboratory conditions with no ill effects. Many of the health issues surrounding hydrogen hydroxide are not even about hydrogen hydroxide, but rather other contaminants. Pure hydrogen hydroxide can be perfectly safe.

    And, remember, this is just more of the same unscientific thinking that has led to marijuana being claimed to have “high potential for abuse,” “no currently accepted medical use,” and lacking in “accepted safety for use.” There is ample evidence to the contrary, but those who would hold citizens in fear as a political means for getting reelected are not interested in reality…only control.

    So the next time someone starts telling you about the dangers of “dihydrogen monoxide” (or marijuana) make it a point to show them the error of their ways. And just because I know that people will be making the accusation, no, I have never received money, good, or services from the “dihydogen monoxide” or “marijuana” lobbies for presenting my opinion.

    (With due props to BunBun vonWhiskers, as published at http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cosmicvariance/2006/08/12/liquid/)

  11. But only on Airplanes. Liquids of all types are still safe to pour together into large conainers in the middle of Airports.

  12. And I would just like to see the reaction on the face of a suspected terrorist after they’d been required to take a swallow of either industrial grade Hydrogen Peroxide, Concentrated Sulferic Acid or Acetone. And our fine chemically illiterate TSA’s must be thinking that all the other fluids in that trash can will do an effective job of diluting out that stuff.

  13. Bad owlbear1, bad! You’re giving terra-ists ideas they didn’t have, like making airports go boom.

    Now I’ll have to duck and cover ever time some bleached blonde tosses her over-priced, designer water into the bin of things too evil to take aboard….

  14. I’m elated to know that Homeland Security hasn’t deemed superfluidity of shampoo and hair gel to be “liquid threats” to airline safety.;)

  15. Oh, sure, the Failed Bush Administration is acting to ban an entire state of matter now — but why have they continued to ignore the dangers of plasma?

  16. In my endless quest to find new ways to embarrass myself on Cosmic Variance, I misspelled “Terrorist” on my version of the phase diagram. I sent a replacement to Sean (thanks for sharing it, Sean.) If anyone wants to make a tee-shirt, this version has the Terror Alert Status font throughout (Bank Gothic).

    Gavin